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QPR Kosher wine options that I have been enjoying recently

In my state of kosher wine industry post – I lamented at the lack of QPR (Quality to Price Ratio) options in the kosher wine world. Now that is not to say that the options do not exist, as you can see by the number of QPR options on my top wines for Passover last year. Still, given the sheer number of wines in a kosher wine store (many hundreds) and the number of kosher wines on the open market (many thousands), we are left with a very small minority – sadly.

So, I thought I would list the most recent QPR wines I have enjoyed over the past 6 months. I wanted to catch up with wines I had not had till later last year and place them in a single easy to find place.

My hope is that people will enjoy the wines and demand more of them. For instance, the lack of many of the QPR wines from Elvi Wines on the open market. I can find them on Royal’s website and on Elvi’s website, but sadly I cannot find them at many wine stores. Thankfully, Kosherwine has gotten the Elvi Cava back along with the Gilgal Brut, but they have older vintages or no vintages of the Elvi options. Onlinekosherwine.com, also has many of the older Elvi wines. I have spoken with Moises and he says they exist here somewhere in the USA – only God knows where though!!! Sadly, the exact same can be said for Netofa wines – another QPR superstar! Where are the wines? I taste them at KFWE – but they are not at stores, online or at shops!

I hope to one day write a post about wine cellaring, but till I do, understand that certain wines are made to enjoy early, like Cava, most 2014 white wines, and lighter reds. The richer and tannic reds can use time in the cellar and that is normal. This list is not a list of wines that are meant for cellaring, though many can withstand a few years. The idea here is to enjoy these wines now while you let the long-term wines cellar and age. We all have that interest to drink interesting wines and while I agree with that, that is NO excuse to raid the cellar when u have a hunkering for a complex note or flavor. Many of these wines will scratch the itch while the beasts’ lie and settle.

Finally, some of these wines are hard to find and they may have different siblings – I will point out when an older one will be an issue or a newer vintage would not be on the list (like the 2011 Ella Valley Cabernet Franc versus the 2012). The 2012 Ella Valley Cabernet Franc would never be on this list. The 2011 is a fine wine for another year, after that I fear it will turn to date juice.

Also, many of the white/rose/bubbly wines will be repeats from the various posts I made, as most of the 2015 whites and rose are not coming to the USA as they are shmita in Israel. I tried to keep these wines under 30 dollars or so, some are more most are less and that is the point of this list. Of course, that means that for some wineries there will be one or no options, like Matar or Four Gates Winery. Though I could have thrown in the Four Gates Chard – which is a lovely wine, it is still far from my goal to add into this bucket. The same can be said for many more wineries. Also, 2015 Israeli wines are not on this list, actually no 2015 wines are on this list, though Hagafen Winery, has released their 2015, but I have yet to taste them and the 2014 Hagafen wines are the ones on the market anyway. Finally, wines that can only be found in Israel like the epic Tabor Rose of 2014 and the 2014 Reca Gris du Marselan and the yatir rose and the new 2014 Yatir Viognier – and so on. All of these wines are not on this list because they are hard to find, but they are on previous lists I have posted.

So, without further ado – here is my list of kosher QPR winners so far and if you have any more please tell me!! They are listed below without any real order.

2014 Domaine Netofa White – Score: A- (Crazy QPR)
I must say this is clearly the best Netofa white so far, and I hope they continue to impress! The wine is 100% Chenin Blanc sourced from the slopes of Mount Tabor. The nose is redolent with rich and bright quince, straw, mineral, lemongrass, and wet grass. The mouth on this medium bodied wine is lovely and rich mineral bomb, with more hay, spiced quince, now dry fresh cut grass, green apple, Asian pear, along with a crazy dry and insanely tart crab apple. The finish is long – spicy, dirty, and mineral based, with dry fruit, rich ripping acid, cloves, and nutmeg – BRAVO!!!

2013 Domaine Netofa Red – Score: A- (and more) (QPR!)
This wine is a clear step up from the 2012 Netofa Red, that is not putting the 2012 down in any way, it is just that this wine is even better! This wine is a blend of 65% Syrah and 35% Mourvedre. The nose on this wine is redolent and packed with mineral, lovely smoke, flint, ripe plum, lovely blueberry, with currants in the background. The mouth on this full bodied wine is attacks you first with lovely currants, followed by layers of blueberry, floral notes, richer and more extracted than the 2012, with great mineral, dried strawberry, all wrapped in ripping acid, and lovely tannin. The finish is long, extracted, and richly mineral in style, with blackcurrant, draping tannin, while being spiced with cloves, black pepper, sweet her, and hints of pith and lovely acid. BRAVO!!!

2012 Weinstock Cabernet Franc, Cellar Select – Score: A- (Mevushal) (QPR!)
This is not the same wine as the 2011 vintage, which was crazy and great this vintage started off closed and disjointed, but is now showing far better. The nose on this wine is mad green with red fruit notes, and herb. The mouth on this medium bodied wine is nice and round, with green notes, well balanced with good acid, raspberry, plum, earth, more bell pepper, crazy sweet dill, mouth coating tannin, and green foliage. The finish is long with nice enough acid, forest floor, nice butterscotch, good sweet tobacco, cedar, with tannin adding weight. Read the rest of this entry

The kosher wines I enjoyed this past Passover

Well, Passover has come and gone and while I will not bore you with the details, I did get to cook my brisket and drink some very lovely wines. I have to say, I was away for this Passover from our home, and I brought some wines with me, many of which were great. However, I also visited Hungarian Kosher in Skokie, IL, the original home of kosherwine.com before they sold out to JWines.

When I was there I was happy to see that they were still selling lots of wine from all of the main distributors. The entire story of what happened to kosherwine.com and why it moved over to JWines, is not a mystery and much as it is politics and stuff I do not get into. This blog again, to remind many, is really for me to keep track of my notes and my wines, something I also do on Cellar Tracker. Still, when massive chances like this happen to the kosher wine industry some think I need to talk about it. Well, I do not agree. I like to converse about the overall wine industry, and the things I find issue with, such as the high cost of kosher wine, French Wines, and the date juice coming out of Israel.

The story of kosherwine.com is really not my business; it is between Dan and JWines and other people who I am friendly with, and something that is better left for table fodder.

Now, on to the wines. I was very happy to see a bottle of the 2002 Chateau Leoville Poyferre. WOW what a bottle! Another blockbuster wine that I enjoyed was the 2013 Harkham Shiraz, Aziza. We have spoken about the Harkham Winery and Richie Harkham here and here. The funny thing about this Aziza bottle is that the KA kosher supervision is not actually printed on the label! Mr. Harkham told me it was because of some glitch, and  he sent me a letter from the KA, which stated clearly that the wine is officially kosher.

The next blockbuster was the 2009 Four Gates Merlot and the 2011 Four Gates Chardonnay. Both of them were insane and rich and really opened some few days after they were opened. Finally, the rose and whites from Hajdu and Shirah are still rocking and rolling and so are their new ones! Bravo guys!

After the blockbuster wines – I was lucky to spend some time with friends and family and we each shared wines with each other. My uncle shared a lovely bottle of the 2012 Quinta da Aveleda Vinho Verde Kosher Grinalda! I have never had this wine before, it is a white blend of some crazy grapes, I never heard of that was made in Portugal. I was skeptical to start – but WOW what a great wine and it is DIRT cheap. Sadly, it is only sold in Illinois. So, go to Binny’s or Vineyard’s in Lincolnwood and buy some.

My other friends, GM and RM shared two bottles of wines that they were aging for some time, maybe a bit too long (wink). They were a 1994 Yarden Merlot and a 1999 Hagafen Pinot Noir! Wow, sadly, they were both over the hill for sometime, but what a joy, honor, and experience to enjoy then with my friends. I shared with them a bottle of the 2013 Goose Bay Fume Blanc. The trade was nowhere near fair, but they were just being kind and I was happy to share more, but they seemed happy with that option. Shockingly, the star was yet another wine – a 2003 Weinstock Cellar Select Cabernet Sauvignon! That puppy was insane, rich, layered, black and mouth coating – LOVELY! That was a wine that was opened at its peak and we all GREATLY enjoyed!

The other visit was to BC and CG, CG made some two wicked cool brisket and other tasty side dishes. I shared the left overs of the 2002 Leoville Poyferre, the 2013 Aziza and they shared with me a lovely bottle of the 2008 Ella Valley Vineyards Vineyard’s Choice Personal and the 2012 La Fenetre Red Blend. Many thanks guys and feel better soon CG!!!!

Please post what you had for Passover, or at least your favorites ones from Passover!!

The wine notes follow below:

2003 Weinstock Cabernet Sauvignon, Cellar Select – Score: A- (and more)
WOW! Bravo guys, this is a wine, that is stored well will pay you back in deep dividends! The nose on this wine is redolent with dark brooding fruit, with hints of green notes and lovely cedar. The mouth is full and rich with layers of black and red berry, along with lovely and very elegant mouth coating tannin – lovely! The finish is long with roasted herb, vanilla, tobacco, sweet dill, and chocolate galore! Read the rest of this entry

Three Merlot wines from Israel, two from France, Pacifica Cabernet, and one killer Herzog Napa Cab

2009 Shiloh Merlot, Secret Reserve, Judean HillsI am really behind on my blog, as I have been busy with a new hobby which is taking up all of my time. Anyway, I wanted to highlight the meal we had two weeks ago which was in honor of my nephew and his beux leaving the area to go east. So in honor of them, I wanted to try a bunch of Israeli Merlot wines. Now, when people think of Israel, Merlot is not first on their mind, mostly because many do not appreciate Merlot, which is done incorrectly tastes bland and benign. That blandness and lack of character, was initially its draw, but over time, it was nuked both by the Sideways effect and by its sheer lack of anything fun. The folks in the know, would blank at Merlot from Israel, given the areas hot climate, which is counterproductive to making good Merlot.

The truth is that I have been talking about Merlot from Israel, but Merlot only from the Shomron region, a region that has found a way to harness what Israel has to offer and channel it into lovely and rich Merlot. The Shomron is becoming quite the up and coming wine region, much like the Judean Hills was some ten years ago. Now, Castel, Flam, Tzora, and many other wineries have made the Judean Hills a household name. I think the Shomron will soon follow in its next door neighbors footsteps, and come out from under the shadow of the Jerusalem hills to capture its own claim to fame; namely Merlot!

Merlot, as stated above has many needs, one is climate, two is proper drainage, and three is it needs careful vineyard management to control its vigor, nitrogen levels, and many other intricate issues that make Merlot a finicky grape, though not as maddening as its Sideways replacement Pinot Noir. As a total aside, the Sideways movie to me was far too vulgar and not to my taste, but there is a hidden joke in the movie that many miss. In the movie, the shlubby protagonist, Miles, screams afoul of Merlot and even disses Cabernet Franc, but especially extolls his love for all things Pinot Noir. Why did Miles love Pinot Noir so much, why go to great lengths to get his beloved nectar, well he defined right at the start:

“Um, it’s a hard grape to grow … it’s thin-skinned, temperamental, ripens early … it’s not a survivor like Cabernet, which can just grow anywhere and thrive even when it’s neglected. No, Pinot needs constant care and attention … it can only grow in these really specific, little, tucked- away corners of the world. And only the most patient and nurturing of growers can do it, really. Only somebody who really takes the time to understand Pinot’s potential can then coax it into its fullest expression.”

Read the rest of this entry

2013 Kosher Food and Wine Experience (KFWE) lived up to all its billing

For years I have always sported a purple colored beaming grin when I finish my tasting at the IFWF (International Food and Wine Festival) in LA, which hid my grumbling stomach’s discontent. Like I have documented for years, I never get to eat at the events, even as the entire food court mocks me, attempting to pull me into their warm, delicious, and very present embrace, with their wafting and intoxicating aromas. Still, I stand strong and I taste through the night until my teeth are purple and my stomach is close to rioting on the lack of food. Truth be told, I am not that good at taking notes when eating – the flavors of the food cover up and belie the flavors and aromas of the glass that beckons me closer with its “come hither” look and aromas. So every year, after the event I go to dinner at Jeff’s Sausage (down the street from the new location of the IFWF). Which is sheer madness of course, here I have half the Pavilion at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza, filled with food from one of the best kosher restaurants in the world – Tierra Sur Restaurant, and I pass on that for the spicy and homely fare of Jeff’s Sausage. In no way is this a slight to the joy of Jeff Rohatiner’s cookery and food. Rather, it has been my conscious tradeoff, throughout my many year experience at IFWF to drink through as much of the world-class wine I can before my taste-buds shutdown, rather than give them to the food court, no matter how wonderful it is.

This year was a massive shift for me, gone was the purple grin and my mutinous stomach, as I visited and added the New York KFWE to my travel dates. To say the KFWE was different than the IFWF would be an extreme understatement, the IFWF has close to 1000 people at the show, while the KFWE has closer to 2000 people. Further the event hall at Pier 60 is some 2 to 3 times larger than the Pavilion tent at the Hyatt Regency. Also, there were many options for lunch and dinner from the myriad of NY restaurants that all share half the hall, all clamoring to share their wonderful fare with great fanfare. The Pier 60 overlooks the Marina and Harbor and many folks were outside braving the cold to grab a smoke, but at least they had some comfort of looking at the marina and its waterfront.

To really appreciate the event you had to come to it with a game plan, and there were many guests who had a few of their own. The event started at Noon for those in the trade, a new thing that the KFWE started last year and something that the IFWF has been doing from the start (though initially with a smaller trade time). The trade event was crowded but there could not have been more than a thousand folks there, so access to wine was not a problem in any way. The event hall can easily handle 1000 people, it is a bit more complicated when the number swells to two thousand people, but still there was no pushing or shoving going on even at the end of the public tasting, when the number of guests was at its maximum. But I digress; the trade tasting allowed me to focus solely on wine and the winemakers, which was great. Read the rest of this entry

Harkham Winery – as close as it gets to Kosher Natural Wine

0000018a0-Natural_wines1If you have never heard of Natural Wine than you must be friend’s with the newest Geico Ad Pitchmen that live under a rock! The only real issue with Natural wine is – there is NO clear answer to the question – What is Natural Wine? If you want to know what kosher wine is – my posting and others clearly delineate the rules and laws that define kosher wine.

I loved the way that both Peter Hobbs and Eric Asimov described Natural Wines, simply stated, wine that is created with nothing added and nothing removed. Still, as simple as that sounds, no one talks about the actual rules inside the winery and no one talks about the rules outside the winery. Can you sulfate the vines, many say yes and many say no. Clearly you cannot sulfur the wine with SO2, as that would be adding to the wine.

However, throughout all the clamoring, some things come out loud and clear – natural wine is wine with all of its warts and beauty, with its romanticism, and with all of its nice and ugly sides. In other words, no matter how hard the romantics attempt to spin natural wine, it is still wine that can be great or horrible. I loved the descriptor used for one natural wine; burnt rubber and barn floor. Read the rest of this entry

Harkham Winery Aziza’s Shiraz and Whiskey braised short ribs

This past weekend we enjoyed lovely Whiskey braised short ribs and my last bottle of my Harkham Aziza’s Shiraz. The whiskey braised short ribs are a true joy because the short ribs become so soft that they fall off the bone, yet they have enough texture and structural integrity to make the experience very enjoyable.

The thing about Whiskey braised short ribs is that it is sweet! Why? Because, the Whiskey may be enjoyable, when drunk from a glass, but once the alcohol is burned off, what is left is a bitter liquid that needs to be made palatable with honey or brown sugar. We use brown sugar and that makes for a somewhat sweet sauce.

The sweetness to me is fine, but when pairing this meat dish with wine you now are faced with a somewhat difficult conundrum. You see, meat – fatty meat like spare ribs, scream for a nice red wine. However, sweet food and red wine do not always pair so well. That is why we decided to go with a Shiraz or heavy Syrah (same thing, excepting for perceived styles). The wine easily handles the sweet notes and it has the power and soft body to make for a very enjoyable pairing.

The Aziza vintage that we had was really lovely. This wine has gone through a fair amount of change since we first tasted it in Australia, almost two years ago. Two years ago, the bottle was packed with floral elements and showed little to no blue fruit. A few months ago, the wine was showing lovely blue and black fruit, with a hint of floral notes. This one showed ZERO floral notes but had a lovely symphony of blackcurrant and blueberry fruit that lasted until it was over. The wine died Friday night and what was left was a shell of its former self, but it still showed a lovely reduction of blueberry and blackcurrant liquor. Nice attempt to me and one that, if you have any, should be consumed ASAP or forever hold your peace. To me the wine showed better than the second showing and nowhere near what I enjoyed in Australia. Who knows, maybe I loved the story more than the wine in Australia, but I cherish the memory of Sydney and the wine we enjoyed there, no matter the real score.

The wine note follows below:

2009 Harkham Windarra Winery Aziza’s Shiraz Preservative Free – Score: B++ to A-
The nose starts off with lovely and luscious blueberry, followed by a whiff of alcohol, that blows off soon enough, along with root beer, black pepper perfume, and cloves, and spice. The mouth has a bit of fizz, along with dark cherry, raspberry, blackcurrant, mouth coating tannin, and a hint of cedar that makes for a lovely and rich mouth. The finish is long and spicy, with chocolate, espresso coffee, smoky notes, and vanilla.

Over time the wine loses most of its fruit and displays a lovely and crazy nose and mouth of what I can only describe as blueberry and blackcurrant reduction liquor. The mouth shows hints of animal and the finish continues its stronghold of espresso coffee, white pepper, and chocolate, with a drop of cloves.

Blessedly, I had the wine at its time and enjoyed its after life, but this is a wine to be enjoyed now, or forever hold your peace! Bravo to Richard Harkham and his family for allowing me to share in this lovely wine experience.

Three different kosher Chardonnay Wines – none great – but all solid options

This past week I enjoyed my second Chardonnay in a row, along with a previously discussed Chardonnay as well. Chardonnay is one of those wines that can elicit reactions from people which is not congruent with their normal demeanor. Normally calm people may well enter into a tirade or strongly state – I do not drink Chardonnay! Or I do not drink white wine! I see this mostly on my Shabbos table and with friends when I am a guest at their tables. It makes my life very difficult, as I am very much a white wine lover.

The production of Chardonnay dates back to the time of the Romans, who brought Gouais Blanc from the Balkans, and over time crossed with the more aristocratic Pinot grape. The hybrid evolved, and the weaker clones died off, while many of the crosses showed hybrid vigor, and were selected for further propagation. With so much history behind it, one would think Chardonnay would have been a best seller around the world. Truth be told, in the US it was almost unknown, as France stood strong to its habit of labeling their wines with the bottle’s Chateau or origin rather than its varietal. However, soon after the French lost to the humble wineries of Napa in the 1976 blind tasting event conducted by French judges known as the ‘Judgment of Paris’, the Chardonnay grape quickly became a huge seller.

The sad thing is that success sometimes goes to one’s head, and leads to rather unfortunate outcomes. By the 80’s, America and the world was almost in a “Chardonnay-craze”, driving wineries around the world to rip up perfectly good vineyards to plant Chardonnay. Chardonnay quickly became the drink of socialites in the early 90’s, but just as Chardonnay was picking up steam, almost overnight it lost all of its luster. The market was drinking more red wine, and there was a backlash against heavy, oaky, New World Chardonnays in favor of lighter wines such as Pinot Grigio. There was a new fashion, “ABC” – Anything But Chardonnay, identified by Frank Prial in 1995. Oz Clarke described a view of Chardonnay as “…the ruthless coloniser and destroyer of the world’s vineyards, and the world’s palates”. The criticism was based upon the habit of wine makers to pull out or give up on local varieties in order to plant more Chardonnay, which offered potentially more income but lacked the uniqueness and character of local varieties. Read the rest of this entry

Kosher Syrah Tasting – Cool Weather vs. Warm Weather Syrahs

This past week I finally got the chance to put together the kosher Syrah tasting that I have been craving. I have been stockpiling Syrah for some time and now we finally had the chance to try them all at the same time. I have been at all of the kosher California wineries; Herzog Cellars, Four Gates Winery, Agua Dulce Winery, Shirah Winery, Covenant Winery and the Brobdingnagian Winery, and I have caught the bug of cool weather Syrah. This is not a myth; this is a real change in the manner of which the Syrah expresses itself.

The Syrah tasting consisted of a bunch of kosher California Syrah, along with one from Australia and Israel in the following order. The 2009 Harkham Aziza Shiraz, Preservative Free (not tasting as great as when I had it in Sydney), 2009 Shirah Power to the People, 2003 Four Gates Syrah, 2008 Syraph Syrah/Grenache, 2007 Brobdingnagian Syrah, and the 2004 Yarden Ortal Syrah. The first five are cool weather Syrah, while the Yarden Ortal is an example of hot weather Syrah. The 2007 Brobdingnagian was Jonathan Hajdu’s inaugural release and since than he has gone on to become the associate winemaker at Covenant Winery, while also making more of his Brob wine. The 2008 Syraph was essentially the first release by the Weiss Brothers, though they did make a smaller batch of wine in 2005 as well. The story of Jonathan and the Weiss brothers can be found in a lovely written article by Gamliel Kronemer here.

In cool weather climates, the Syrah grape is very happy to show expressions of smoked meat, black pepper, tobacco, and leather around their core of blue-black fruit. They also have nice acidity, which helps to brighten the mouth and balance out the wine’s palate. The clear note here is that the grape expresses blueberry and watermelon in ways that will astound you. The bright sweet blueberry along with rich black fruit make for a wine that is unique and truly flavorful. The blue fruit may not always appear at first, but a trademark of the cooler climates, in Australian and California, was that they all exhibited rich blueberry fruit intertwined with some lovely black and sometimes watermelon along with spice. In warm climate regions, characteristic Syrah flavors tend toward dark fruits, cherry, white pepper and earthy notes, though leather and tar are sure to also make a guest appearance.

Read the rest of this entry

Harkham Windarra Shiraz and Domaine Netofa Galilee

When we were in Australia this past July, we had the real joy of enjoying a lovely bottle of preservative free wine from a new old Kosher Winery – the Harkham Windarra Winery. The winery is focusing on small batches of fruit, selected predominately from hillside vineyards in the Hunter Valley. Minimal handling, bottling without filtration, only the use of French oak and low levels of preservatives are just some of the techniques used by their passionate Burgundian trained winemaker Christian Knott. The winery was established in 1985 and the Harkham family took over in 2005. Since then they have upgraded the facilities and changed the winemaking philosophy.

When we last tasted the wine(s) from the Harkham Windarra Winery, one was a superstar and one was a wine that I did not love, but thought I needed to give another chance. Well, now I will get my chance, as we stated in that post, the Harkham Windarra Shiraz is being imported to the US by Royal Wines, and it is available at many online stores, for as low at 17 dollars. I hope to get a bottle and get back to you about it. For now remember that it is mevushal, so do not think that this bottle is for cellaring. The wine for cellaring is its bigger brothers, the Harkham Shiraz Reserve, and the star of the show, the preservative free (free of added sulfites) 2009 Aziza’s Shiraz. They have just released the 2010 Aziza and Reserve, but they are still in Australia. Also, as stated in the post, the winery is currently only shipping the lower level label – the mevushal 2009 Shiraz, the other higher level labels are staying local in Australia, where they happily sell out to local merchants, both kosher and non-kosher alike.

The other new interesting wine on the market that is keeping to the same Shiraz theme from a new winery created by Pierre Miodownick, the head wine maker of all Royal Wine’s European wines. He has released four wines, as described here on Daniel Rogov’s post, but only one of them has been exported to the US, the Domaine Netofa Galilee. The wine is available now locally at a few online stores, and I hope to be taste it soon as well.

Happy Wine Hunting!!

Harkham Winery and the Sydney Skyline make for a wonderful shabbos in Australia

We left for Australia on Monday night, and we arrived Wednesday morning – 14+ hours in an airplane!  Thank God we slept most of the flight.  I must say that kosher airplane food has become so inedible, that it is an honest to God disgrace.  Really, does the food have to be so bad?  Thank goodness my wife brought food along, so we were covered.  Anyway, this trip was not about wine, it was all about seeing this wonderful country and a bit of relaxation.  Really, you are in a country for two weeks, that is the size of the 48 contiguous states, and you are still wondering why it takes so long to drive to that mountain range or walk to the beach.  The place is huge, it is the fourth largest exporter of wine, yet as much as we drove, we never saw a vineyard.  Sure they exist, and we saw signs for wineries, but nary a vineyard in sight.  It is like saying I drove through all of California on the main highways (5 or 101), and I visited San Francisco, and Los Angeles, and I did not see a single vineyard.  Yeah, because the place is huge and that is NOT where they are!!  Anyway, the country is gorgeous, the people are so nice, the only real issue I had with the place was that everything other than casinos, some restaurants, and a tiny number of supermarkets, everything closes at 5 or 5:30 PM sharp!  Are you kidding me!

Anyway, we arrive in Sydney on Wednesday, and take in the sights of the Sydney harbor, the rocks, the botanical gardens, and much more.  By the time we get back we are dead to the world, but we have to shop for shabbos, as we were staying in the city, and not going to Bondi beach (where most of the Jews in Sydney live).  Our friend was SUPER nice and picked us up from the hotel and took us to the area to shop for food.  There too everything was closing already, but we got the chance to go into the local kosher market and other than a few items, we left empty handed.  The prices are crazy high, and the value was nowhere to be found.  I took a quick peek at the wines there, and none were very interesting or good (base line Barkan and the such), and again the prices were out of control.  So we went to Katzy’s to wait for our friend, who was getting his kids to sleep, and then coming by for dinner with his wife.  We had not seen him for some 11 or so years since he left the bay area, so it was great catching up with him.

Now, I was still minus a bottle of wine for shabbos, and the proprietor of Katzy’s was kind enough to point out that most of the things we would want for shabbos could be bought at the rare (yes it exists) 24 hour Coles supermarket at Bondi Junction.  We went to the store later in the evening, after dinner, and it had tons of kosher items, which is nice, but they had no wine, as in Australia wine, beer, and spirits are NOT sold in most stores.  Rather, they are sold at shops called Bottles Shops, and they too are not allowed to be open too late.  Anyway, while waiting at Katzy’s for our friend, I did what can only be called a David.  Yep, my wife has named my behavior after my name.  I walked up to a person waiting in line at the restaurant, and asked them “Where can I find a decent bottle of wine around this area”?  The person turned around and said, no, but maybe this guy does, pointing to a young man to his right.  Who did this person turn out to be, the son of Menashe Harkham, the owner of Harkham Windarra Winery!!!  Yep, by “sheer luck” I fell upon the winery. The young man sold me a bottle of 2009 Harkham Windarra Winery Aziza’s Shiraz Preservative Free.

The winery was initially called Windarra Winery, which started in 1985 and produced wine and liquors.  The wines slowly went down in quality and the winery was finally sold to the Harkham family in 2005.  Initially, they produced no wines or liqueur, after taking the winery over.  However, Richard Harkham, the winery’s GM, one day entered into the winery to help the old owner, and never looked back.  Soon after that he won his first award for his 2007 Shiraz.  The first kosher wine was the 2008 vintage, which sold out to restaurants and wine stores.  The 2009 vintage (which is on the web page) was splintered in a way.  The entry level wine – the 2009 Shiraz was sold out to Royal Wines, who has just imported the wine into the USA, and is mevushal.  As we finally sat down for dinner with my friend, Menashe swung by the table, and kindly offered us a glass of the 2009 Harkham Shiraz (Mevushal), and we kindly accepted.  I was so tired from the trip that I could not really taste the wine, from a tasting perspective, but it came over a bit lighter than I expected with pepper, floral notes, and a distinct mevushal taste.  It may have been me or the wine, but I will be doing a more official tasting of it, when it arrives in US stores.  I never got to taste the 2009 Shiraz Reserve, as it too was 100% sold to restaurants and shops.  When I contacted Richard a few days before our departure, he was super kind to point me to the lovely wine shop in Vaucluse (a suburb of Sydney) called Vaucluse Cellars.  We picked up a couple of bottles of the Aziza to take home and try again in a few months.  The Aziza’s Shiraz was also sold 100% to shops and restaurants. The Aziza’s Shiraz is named after Richard’s Grand Mother who passes away in early 2009.

The Harkham Winery has been doing extremely well in Australia, with rave reviews and a continuous stream of people knocking on their door for their wines.  The super cool thing is that the wine is NOT known as the ONLY kosher wine produced in Hunter Valley, but rather as a really good winery that produces wine in Hunter Valley.  The kosher symbol is almost impossible to find on the bottle, and that is fine.  It brings back memories of the first time I heard about Capcanes Peraj Ha’Abib (from Montsant Spain) from a friend of mine who received Robert Parker’s newsletter – the Wine Advocate.  The newsletter called the Peraj Ha’Abib the best kosher wine (at that time), and one that no one knew about, as it was not yet imported by Royal at that time.  So I went scurrying around to find a few bottles, and I called the then importer Eric Solomon of European Cellars, and asked which wine stores you sold the wines to.  He gave me a wine store in NY (no not Gotham), and when I called them I asked them if they had the kosher wine from Spain?  That was a mistake.  They had no idea that Capcanes was even kosher – and for good reason – because the wine was killer whether it was kosher or not.  Anyway, same here, the nice man who sold me my bottles of Aziza’s Shiraz, could care less if the wine was kosher or not (though he knew); he just really liked the stuff.  In fact so does many wine stores and bars in Sydney! Check out these non-kosher restaurants and wine bars that pour the wine!  Yulli’s Bar, Number One Wine Bar, The Bentley Bar, Seans Panaroma and Bilsons.

All this and I have yet to mention the other amazing facts of this winery.  They are the only winery in Hunter Valley that has produced sulfite and preservative free wines!  No not quite Alice Approved, as it used oak and yeast, but the oak is not so pronounced in the wine, as the notes below will show, but the yeast is a non-starter 🙂  Richard is the co-wine maker, but he uses the expertise of one of the renowned flying wine makers; Beaune (Burgundy) based Christian Knott.  It is a win-win situation here.  Think about it, February and March are pretty dull in Burgundy, not much going on wine wise, except for maybe some bottling.  However, in Australia it is harvest season and the wine maker is busy full time.  This of course works great for the flying wine makers.  They work half the time in France and half the time in the southern hemisphere, either South America, South Africa, or Australia.  Christian clearly brings a Burgundian approach to the wine with bramble and mineral, but it still has the massive pepper and crazy dark complexity that says Hunter Valley.

When we talk about preservative free, it does not mean organic!  What? You see in the USA, the rules are VERY simple, you CANNOT add any preservatives in ANY manner – as described here, (sorry the data is in a PDF) on the USDA website.  But in Australia, they are allowed to add up to 125 ppm (parts per million) of sulfites to the wine. However, the Aziza’s Shiraz is 100% preservative free, meaning no added sulfites.  As described above, there is almost NO 100% free sulfite wine, unless the sulfites are filtered out.  Why?  Because sulfites happen naturally when wines are fermented.  Further, to be called organic in the US or in Australia, the grapes must have been grown and maintained organically.  The grapes at Harkham Winery are not yet organically grown and maintained, so the bottle cannot be labeled with anything other than 100% preservative free, instead of 100% organic, which would be far easier in Australia to pull off.  That said, there is a push and a market being created by the need of people for 100% preservative added wines – why?  Because there are a small percentage of the world who are allergic or react poorly to sulfites in wine.  How many?  The USDA describes it as 1/100 as stated here.

Well, after enjoying dinner with our friends, we bought a rotisserie chicken from Katzy’s to go, and then our friends kindly drove us back to our hotel.  We also made our way back to Bondi Station on Thursday night to pick up some more stuff for Shabbos and we were set.  The chicken was so-so, not a huge hit with my wife, and the chicken soup that we also picked up at Katzy’s was more salt than flavor, so no winners from Katzy’s for the shabbos.  That said, the hummus and Israeli salad that we made, along with some nice brown rice was a winner and it all worked out in the end.

Many thanks to Richard, Menashe, and his other son, for allowing us to enjoy the wonderful wine from Harkham Winery, and best wishes on more success in the future!  The wine note follows below:

2009 Harkham Windarra Aziza’s Shiraz Preservative Free – Score: A- to A
This wine has two lives it starts with red fruit, but as it airs out, the wine turns black with chocolate.  At first the nose on this dark purple colored wine is redolent with huge floral notes, massive white pepper, rose hips, ripe plum, and fig.  The mouth on this full bodied wine is complex, layered, rich, and crazy concentrated to start with white pepper, a crazy attack of tannins and structure, floral notes, plum, raspberry, and nice oak.  The mid palate flows off the mouth with solid acid, integrating tannins, and oak.  The finish is long with oak, figs, cocoa, plum, and raspberry, and white pepper.  The pepper and intensity flows all the way through.  Once the wine grabs a few gulps of air, maybe an hour at most, the nose of the wine transforms into a black beast, with blackberry, ripe black plum, chocolate, and oak.  The wine turns inky and black in the mouth, with extra ripe blackberry, inky concentration, black plum, more concentrated white pepper (which softens with time), and nice oak.  This wine has a powerful backbone of acid which will hold it in good stead, as there are no added sulfites, which will allow it to lie in the cellar for a few more years at least.  A fun and powerful wine that I look forward to tasting again in a few months.


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