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A wonderful, unique, and exciting tasting of white and Orange wines with EIGHT QPR WINNERS and a few serious duds

This past week I was tasting through the rose wines to get them tasted in time before Passover. This is a super short post – really just hey like, looks at these QPR (Quality to Price Ratio) wines – and please ignore rose wine for 2021, there is nothing to see there, in that kosher wine segment.

I want to highlight some of the great white and orange wines – that I had over the past tastings – with the last tasting Friday before Shabbat – just a great way to rid my mind and taste buds of the roses I had to suffer through to get to these wines!

A total aside, partial happy rant – THANK YOU! Thank you all for finally getting rid of corks and using DIAM or amalgamated corks – thank you all very much! Keep up the great work, on all wines in the simple wine category – please!! I am talking to you Ramon Cardova Albarino! Please everyone use DIAM or some amalgamated cork – thanks – I am done with my rant!

As always, nothing I post here gets me anything from those who make the wines. If they send me wines or if I buy them, if I like it I will say so, if I dislike it – I will say so, look at all those roses I did not like. Enough said I need to remind people of this every so often.

Michael Kaye makes a few wines and the one he sent me was the 2019 Kaye Dry Muscat and what a wine it is! It needs a bit of time to open, and it has a drop of reduction, but that is almost like the Tel Qasser in style, meaning the reduction is additive, not subtractive! What a wine it is, with time the acid appears and the wine is incredibly layered and expressive – get some! His website is not up yet but email him at michaelkaye@fastmail.com or find him on Facebook and messenger him there, again Michael Kaye is his name.

Shiran wines made a lovely 2020 Riesling, the price is insane, but it is a solid wine and that makes me happy. All we need to do now is find a way to make the price meet the value.

The QPR superstar of the past, the Ramon Cardova Albarino, fell off a bit with the 2019 vintage. Still a nice wine, but it lacks the punch and richness of the 2018 vintage. Still a QPR WINNER and a wine to enjoy.

In comparison, Yaffo made a lovely white wine from 2020 that is a QPR WINNER and one that you should find at kosherwine.com

Talking about kosherwine.com, they brought in more of the 2018 Binyamina Orange Wine, it is a wine that needs to be handled with care – the wine starts closed, but with an hour or so, it opens nicely, but then it falls off a bit after many hours. So, I would open, give it time, and finish it. Just a PSA.

The 2019 Vitkin Gewurztraminer has the same issue, it threads the needle as well. It needs time to show its great style, but then it loses a bit of the finish. So, the theme continues here. Open it, give it some air, then finish it and enjoy! To have created anything good in that horrible 2019 vintage from Israel is EPIC! Still, the best 2019 from Israel is the 2019 Netofa Latour white – just WOW!

The same issue appeared with the 2020 Matar Sauvignon-Blanc and Semillon, a lovely wine another QPR WINNER, but it too threads the needle, so I recommend that you open, wait a bit, and then finish it.

Finally, the 2018 Netofa Tel Qasser white is INSANE it is that simple, just 100% INSANE! Best wine of the tasting, followed by the Kaye (from a style and profile, and score). The Tel Qasser white is classic Roussanne and one you would love to sit and watch evolve. This wine can be enjoyed now or in 6 years or anywhere in between. Yes, I have the window for it starting in 2 years, but with a decant you can enjoy this wine now as well.

PSA: I fear that while 2019 Israeli white and rose wine vintage was a total disaster, with a few outliers, 2020 is looking much better. Still, they do not feel like wines that will last long, so open and enjoy them!

PSA 2 – I have now had two wines from the winery called La Foret Blanche (the rose and now the white), they were both oxidized bottles of mess. I would be careful before buying. Try it somewhere else or ask if you can return it before buying.

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Kos Yeshuos Winery’s new U.S. release for 2021, and 2019 South African ESSA Wine Co. wines

WOW, I cannot believe I just wrote that number, but yes, we made it through 2020, and I hope all of you are safe and well. The prize for reaching 2021 is more wine, and Josh Rynderman, the Dual-Hemisphere winemaker of Kos Yeshuos Winery and ESSA Wine Co., swung by last week and we tasted his new release for 2021, the 2020 Kos Yeshuos Viognier. Sadly, this year, there are no cool marketing/moniker-driven wine names. Other than the Wylder Side Orange Viognier, but that is a super-small production promotional item.

Sadly, 2020 was a horrible year for many, in the wine world and outside of it. Sadly, because of fires, smoke, crazy heat waves, and God knows what else, Kos Yeshuos only made the Viognier, but it is a really good wine!

To see more about the story and life of Kos Yeshuos and the Ryndermans, you can read my post here about last year’s wines, and this post about the wines made under ESSA Wine Co. Sadly, the ESSA Wine Co. wines are still not available here in the USA, but they are nice!! We tasted the ESAA Wine Co. wines in September 2020, and the wine notes are also below.

Well, as you know Josh is a friend, and as always I make sure to disclaim things like that before posting my notes, like with Benyamin Cantz of Four Gates Winery. So, with that, my many thanks to Josh for coming by with the new wines to taste, safe travels, and best of luck on the 2021 Harvest in South Africa! Remember to bring me more of those wonderful South African reds when you are back in July/August 2021!

The wine notes follow below – the explanation of my “scores” can be found here:

2020 Kos Yeshuos Viognier – Score: 92 (QPR: EVEN)
The notes are on a bottle that was bottled less than 2 weeks ago. To start the nose opens to smell very much like the 2018 California Kid, which was Viognier/Sauvignon Blanc, this vintage is 100% Viognier. The nose starts with bright peach, pear, citrus, gooseberry, fresh hay, cardamom, jasmine, and flint galore. The mouth on this medium-bodied wine is lovely, layered, and rich, with waves of acidity that are almost overcoming, but they are tempered by the smoke, flint, peach, citrus galore, ripe pomelo, with an almost oily texture, followed by waxy notes, with lovely weight, ripe apricot, yellow pear, and more hay. The finish is long, green, with hints of foliage, more tart and juicy yellow fruit, gooseberry, honeydew, and loads of flint, smoke, and green notes. Bravo! Drink until 2023. (tasted Dec 2020)

2020 Kos Yeshuos Wylder Side Orange – Score: 92
This wine is a blend of Viognier and Chardonnay made in an Orange style. This wine starts closed with apple notes and not much else. With a few hours of decanting the nose opens to what I expect from an Orange Viognier, with notes of almonds, candied peach, apricot, cardamom, sweet rosehip, sweet jasmine, with creme brulee, and fresh apple compote. The mouth on this medium-bodied wine is fun, the acid hits you first, but that is quickly overcome by waves of sweet tannin, followed by an oily texture that coats the mouth with sweet apricot, peach, oak, and notes of smoke and toast. The finish is long, toasty, smoke, flint, mineral, roasted walnuts, and more tannin that lingers forever. Bravo!! Drink until 2024. (tasted Dec 2020)

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Kosher Orange wines from California and Israel, QPR WINNERS

I made this a QPR (Quality to Price Ratio) wine category and in many ways I regret it. What I did here was to create a situation where the only competition that exists is the next vintage! Essentially, if you want Orange wine or extended-maceration white wine, you want Yaacov Oryah wines. Not complicated at all. There are a few more out there and they are WINNERS, like the Shirah Orange Wine, and Binyamina Wines made one. Sadly, the Binyamina is sold out here in the USA, but the Shirah is for sale on their site and it is a WINNER! Get some! Kos Yeshuos made one, but in such tiny quantity that it was not for sale. Yaacov Oryah Orange wines are here in the USA and are sold by Andrew Breskin (AKA Liquid Kosher) – check them out!

I have spoken about Orange wine before, mostly when writing about Yaacov Oryah wines. Orange wine is simply the process of leaving white grapes to ferment on their skins, like red wine. To Mr. Oryah it is the truest expression of a white grape varietal and one that Israel can use now to create great white wines, while it searches for more data points on the path for Israel’s white varietals of the future.

The skins add more than just a bit of color, they add a huge amount of natural phenolics, along with tannin (yes tannin in white wine), and then it adds a few extracurricular notes, that some could find challenging. Notes that are defined as nuts and other aspects of reduction or oxidation. The point though is that orange (AKA extended-maceration white) wines are trying to expose more of the white wine than we get from the press and age/bottle style of white wines. Many of the orange wines show the proper and incredible next step beyond white wines we all know. The rich and layered complexity that skins add without some of the extracurricular notes. Some of the wines show those notes and many will find them wonderful, like myself, but in all, it is a show of control, experimentation, and more dots on the plot to a richer future.

When I tasted through the 2019 Yaacov Oryah wines I saw two things that were not as evident in previous vintages. First, the 2019 vintage, for Israel, was HORRIBLE! Yes, I have stated this over and over, but it affected everyone. Second, this was the best showing of a varietal, in regards to Orange wine, then I have ever had. The Viognier, was Viognier, even after the extended -maceration. Same with the Chardonnay and onwards.

Overall, I found the Orange wines to be quite enjoyable. I am posting the 2018 and 2019 vintages of Yaacov Oryah wines, along with the other two Orange wines I had this year. The issue I have revolves around the QPR part of this. There are essentially many Oryah wines and a few others, this is EXACTLY what I was trying to avoid, and now I ran head into it with Orange wines. I stated the logic around the QPR (Quality to Price Ratio) wine categories as trying to find the grouping logic that gave me the largest sample set. Well, I FAILED horribly with this one. Also, the QPR scoring only works for the USA, Oryah wines are imported by Andrew Breskin’s Liquid Kosher. They are of course sold in Israel, but I do not have solid pricing there and that is too complicated. So, yeah, #FAIL, learned from this mistake. Going forward, this category will fall into the Ageable white wines (a post I need to get done as well) and the simple white wines.

PSA: This subject is very debated, but I find that Orange wines show best when cold. The heat on the wines shows as they warm to room temperature, so BEWARE!

The wine notes follow below – the explanation of my “scores” can be found here:

2018 Yaacov Oryah The Anthology of Spice, Alpha Omega – Score: 93 (QPR: WINNER)
This wine is a blend of 50% Gewurztraminer, 40% Chardonnay, and 10% Roussanne. The 50% Gewurztraminer found here is the fruit that I spoke about above, fruit that was going to be wasted for just being itself, heady and spicy. As an Homage of an Homage, yeah more play on play on words, the wine talks to the original AO of old, while also staking this epic spicy fruit to two sturdy partners that add so much, while letting the Gewurtztraminer by itself, without being offensive.
This is not a pineapple juice wine, this wine is more about the Gewurztraminer’s spice, with control, floral notes, blossoms galore, with rosehip, and jasmine-like notes, with apple, and earth. The mouth on this wine is beautifully tannic, great structure, showing a crazy fruit/spiced/mineral structure, with smoke, funk, with crazy layers upon layers of the spices, tannin, with rich extraction, with even more tannin structure than the previous wines, showing spice, nutmeg, cloves, crazy allspice, and floral notes, that give way to roasted herb notes, dry hay, straw, and green/yellow apple lingering long with melon, more grass, lemon, and spice galore lingering long. WOW!! Drink by 2025. (tasted May 2019)

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