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Four Summer wines from ElviWines – including two more QPR WINNERS!

When I was in Paris I asked Moises Cohen, from Elvi Wines to ship the new 2021 wines to my hotel. I have written many times about Elvi Wines, including giving them the Winery of the year award for 2021. Moises was so very kind to send them, but then I moved hotels, crazy story for another time. Thankfully, I was not far from the hotel and I rolled in twice to get my wines. As I hinted in my previous post, it was humorous to ask the Concierge for my boxes when I was not a hotel guest. He understood the situation and was more than happy to help.

As I stated in my year in review when I gave Elvi Wines the winery of the Year award, Elvi is not just about big expensive wines. The majority of their wines garner QPR (Quality to Price Ratio) scores regularly. Even the most expensive wines, other than the Sublim, are all in the QPR range.

These four wines are a great example of how diverse and yet wonderful Elvi Wines is. As I posted, in one of my earliest posts on Elvi Wines, more than ten years ago, Mr. Cohen wanted the winery to “sojourn” all around Spain to develop a range of wines, from local grapes, that reflect their respective terroir. The logo on the bottle draws from this inspiration, a Mediterranean boat, with which they can travel across Spain, to harvest and bottle the best of what Spain has to offer. The winery consults with many vineyards and wineries, which allows them to select from many wineries all around Spain where they can make the best wine for the value.

The four wines summer wines hail from regions as diverse as Alella, La Mancha, and Rioja! Three very different regions of Spain, all separated by hundreds of miles in each direction. Still, with all the work required to make this dream a reality, the wines show their terroir and the quality that Elvi Wines has come to be synonymous with. A true joy.

This year, the Cohens have made wine from a new kosher varietal, at least for me, Xarello! I am not an idiot, I know Xarello is used in Cava production, but this is the first still version of Xarello that I have seen made kosher. It is funky, fun, and a true treat! I hope it comes to the USA soon! The main issue with these wines is that they are not available here in the USA yet, other than maybe the 2021 Herenza rose. Which I think is in stock now at Royal.

As usual, the 2021 version of Herenza White is lovely, and one wine that will last a bit longer than the other three. The blend of Pansa Blanca and Sauvignon Blanc just screams with brightness and refreshing notes. Not as funky as the Xarello but also a wine with a richer mouthfeel and lovely minerality. The two roses are solid to nice.

I hope they will come soon and be for sale, these wines are not for long holding, other than the Herenza white, as such I hope they are for sale soon here in the USA.

Many thanks to Moises and Anne for sharing their wonderful wines with me and shipping them to Paris! The wine notes follow below – the explanation of my “scores” can be found here and the explanation for QPR scores can be found here:

2021 Elvi Wines Vina Encina Blanco, Alella (M) – Score: 91 (QPR: WINNER)
This is one of the first ever kosher Xarello kosher wines that I know of. The nose of this wine is fun, with loads of saline, lime blossom, ginger, peach, and smoke, fun! The mouth of this medium-bodied wine is refreshing and very tart with impressive texture, and funk. almond paste, Kaffir lime, smoke, peach, ginger, and more lime, lovely, tart, and flinty – refreshing and lovely! The finish is long, green, herbal, flinty, and fun! Drink now. (tasted May 2022) (in Paris, France) (ABV = 12%)

2021 Elvi Wines Vina Encina Rosado , La Mancha (M) – Score: 88.5 (QPR: GREAT)
The nose of this rose is riper than I like but it is also a bit funky and dirty. The mouth of this medium-bodied rose, shows good acidity, funk, strawberry, raspberry, flint, and orange flavors, but it is a bit simple and rustic, with a nice pith. The finish is long, rustic, and pithy. Drink now. (tasted May 2022) (in Paris, France) (ABV = 13%)

2021 Elvi Wines Herenza White, Alella – Score: 91.5 (QPR: WINNER)
This wine is a blend of 60% Pansa Blanca & 40% Sauvignon Blanc. The nose of this lovely wine is screaming with gooseberry, lychee, pink grapefruit, orange blossom, and nice minerality. The mouth of this medium-bodied wine shows lovely acidity, lovely precision, good fruit focus with more acidity, minerality, saline, gooseberry, lovely tension, honeyed citrus, lemon/lime, and minerality. The finish is long, green, tart, and mineral-focused, with great saline, slate, flint, and sweet/tart fruit. Lovely! Drink until 2024. (tasted May 2022) (in Paris, France) (ABV = 12%)

2021 Elvi Wines Herenza, Rose, Rioja – Score: 90 (QPR: GREAT)
The nose of this wine shows nice red fruit, with orange blossom, citrus, and smoke. The mouth of this medium-bodied wine is nice, with good acidity, mouth-filling, with fruit focus, strawberry, raspberry, blossom, and more good minerality. Quite refreshing and enjoyable. The finish is long, tart, and mineral-driven, with rock, flint, saline, Orangina, and slate. Enjoy! Drink now! (tasted May 2022) (in Paris, France) (ABV = 13%)

A lovely and expansive vertical tasting at Elvi Wines Clos Mesorah in Montsant – Nov 2021

So, a quick recap of my life over the past 45 days. I was in Paris in November along with Avi Davidowitz of Kosher Wine Unfiltered. Avi and I tasted lots of wines and more posts about those wines are forthcoming. Avi left a few days after he arrived to return to his family in Israel for Shabbat and I stayed Shabbat in France. On Sunday I flew to Spain to taste wines with Moises and Anne, which I will be posting here. Then I flew back to Paris, hung out with family, and then flew home.

Two weeks later, I was back on a plane to Tanzania to climb Kilimanjaro. During the 2 weeks I was home I was training or working the entire time, so I barely got the Royal Wine tasting post up! Thankfully I climbed it safely and returned home. The 7 days on that mountain was the longest stretch of my adult life away from a computer, totally surreal for me! Anyway, I am now home and I will be working on my posts, God willing!

So, now back to wine, this post is about Elvi Wines, I have written many times about Elvi Wines, the first post I wrote about Moises and ElviWines is this. Truthfully, nothing has changed about that post, in regards to Elvi Wines, other than the labels and a few wines being dropped to streamline the marketing of the wines. My next main post on Elvi Wines was when I visited the winery with my wife. Before, in between, and after, I have been consistently posting their wines in my QPR posts, wines of the year, and so on. Why? Because they make exceptional wines at reasonable prices and they make a great selection of them under many labels. The labels have evolved, some wines dropped, but overall, since I met Moises one day in San Francisco, tasting through the wines, I heard the story, the dream, and we have all been blessed to watch the trajectory of the winery. It continues to evolve, creating wonderful wines for a reasonable price while proving that Cabernet Sauvignon is not the only red wine that you can sell to the kosher wine buyer.

It is still harder to sell wines as diverse and different as Elvi does. There is no Cabernet, there is no Merlot, sure they find their ways into the EL26 blend, but overall, Elvi is an expression of Spain – not an expression of the kosher wine palate. Elvi typifies Spain to the kosher buyer more than any other option and it has continued to excel in doing it. Sadly, we have seen Capcanes, which is a 5-minute drive from Clos Mesorah, take a large step backward. They too showed the potential of Spain, as a new-world wine in old-world clothing. Sadly, they have drunk from the same fountain of fruit, that so many Israeli wineries have, and they have lost their way. Thankfully, Elvi Wines, Clos Mesorah, and Vina Encina continue to not only execute with great wines they also are improving and growing with new vineyards and winery plans.

I arrived a few hours late because the train systems in Spain are massively antiquated and stopped running for a few hours. Once I arrived, we had the opportunity to start tasting through many a wine. The plan was simple, taste through the wines of Elvi, in a few verticals. A Vertical tasting, in this example, is when you taste the same wine across many vintages. After some tasting, we would have dinner and then go to sleep. The next day we would taste more, go out and see some lovely architecture, then swing by the new vineyards in Priorat, and then finish the tasting, get dinner, and then sleep early as the flight back to Paris is early.

As stated, eventually I got to the winery and the first vertical we did was all the Clos Mesorah wines from 2009 through 2019, except for the 2011 and 2012 vintages that do not exist. That was followed by a partial vertical of Herenza White (AKA InVita) wines. I appreciate tart and acidic wines like the Invita and they showed well, including some with age on them.

The tastings were really fun because tasting through Clos Mesorah is an opportunity to taste through the years of Priorat. Some vintages were very unique, while others were much akin to each other. Each one spoke of the vintage in their own ways, really inspiring. The one constant is acidity, deeply rooted, much akin to Four Gates and Chateau Malartic. Of course, Clos Mesorah is not as old-world as Chateau Malartic, but it has the acidity from its old-world terroir to balance some of its new-world fruit structure. Four Gates Merlot has the same staying power because of the acid that is so deeply core to its very being.

Tasting with Moises Cohen and Anne was a real joy. I have tasted with them before but this time the lineup was far more extensive and that gave me a chance to see what they look for in wine as they described what they thought they liked about the wines and what stood out in each of them, from their perspective. My notes are always what I taste, but my blog will attempt, at times, to emote some of what I hear from the winemaker or the host. In this case, Anne is very clearly passionate about the wine, it shows from the conversations and the notes she describes. Moises is equally passionate, but you can see him defer to Anne when it comes to the wine. Moises cut his teeth in the wine world on the vines and the terroir but eventually, that comes to the wine. The saying goes; wine is made in the vineyard. Together they make a dynamic duo that comes out in many ways. The artistry of the wine, the labels, the overall style they want – that is a duality between Anne and Moises, but Anne seems to take the lead there. In regards to the vineyards, the plushness of the wine, the weight, the overall mouthfeel, there Moises tends to lead, though Anne is side by side as well. The dance is fascinating to watch, explore, and just stand to the side and let happen. Overall, this tasting left me super happy for many reasons. First of all, Clos Mesorah is one of the most consistently great wines out there, even if the track record is a bit short. However, what stood out is the dance between Moises and Anne and the mutual respect they have for each other. Fun times indeed.

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